Electric car leasing is a great way to get behind the wheel of a brand-new electric vehicle (EV) at a more affordable monthly cost.

But if you’ve not made the switch from combustion to electric yet, it can be a confusing world.

From charging times to tax implications and real-world range, there are so many new elements to consider.

With the 2030 petrol and diesel ban looming, there’s a strong possibility your next car might be your first EV.

We’ve rounded up our top five tips to help you get a great electric car lease on the first time of asking – without any hassle.

1. Consider your mileage

Driving visualisation screen inside a Tesla Model 3.

Your lifestyle and how much you drive is the biggest consideration when it comes to picking your EV.

There are a variety of options, from superminis like the Smart Fortwo with its 80-mile range, right up to cars like the Polestar 2 or Audi e-Tron with the ability to travel up to 250 miles on a single charge.

Knowing your rough daily mileage is a good starting point when it comes to picking the car that will work for you and your family.

While your eye might be caught by the splashy Tesla Model Y, there are some very good EVs out there outside of the big manufacturers.

MG’s electric line-up is going from strength to strength, with the recent release of the MG4 EV cementing the British brand as one of the ‘go-to’ for affordable electric car lease deals.

Volkswagen are also worth a look, with its ID-badged line-up, or Citroen and Peugeot with their electrified variants of popular petrol cars.

Read more: Car leasing: Who is eligible?

2. Look outside premium brands

A brand new 2022 MG4 Electric SUV in orange.

While your eye might be caught by the splashy Tesla Model Y, there are some very good EVs out there outside of the big manufacturers.

MG’s electric line-up is going from strength to strength, with the recent release of the MG4 EV cementing the British brand as one of the ‘go-to’ for affordable electric car lease deals.

Volkswagen are also worth a look, with its ID-badged line-up, or Citroen and Peugeot with their electrified variants of popular petrol cars.

3. Think about at-home charging

A battery electric vehicle (BEV) charges on a level 2 home charge point on April 21, 2022 in Manchester, England.

While there is an initial cost involved with installing an EV charger at home, in the long run, it will save you time and money.

Public rapid chargers are good in a pinch, but you’ll be paying a premium, and public slower chargers work best when you’re going to be parked up for a while. But an at-home charger means you can plug in overnight and wake up to a fully juiced car.

If you don’t want to cough up a lump sum outright, charger subscriptions – which allow you to spread the cost of a charger over a set period – are a good alternative, allowing you to access at-home charging for a monthly payment.

Read more: Is it better to lease an electric vehicle?

4. Look at the whole life cost

Carparison Leasing

Sure, an electric car might look more expensive at first glance.

But with the money you save on road tax and running costs, EVs can work out to be cheaper than their petrol or diesel counterparts.

It’s worth crunching the numbers to work out just how much you could save throughout your EV lease.

5. Consider GAP insurance

Carparison Leasing

Taking out GAP insurance alongside your lease protects you should the worst happen and your car is declared a total loss.

It pays out the difference between the market value of your car at the time it’s written off and how much is left on your finance agreement, protecting you against any unexpected losses.

It might even leave you with some cash to take out a new car lease, so you’re not left walking everywhere.

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